Building Teams for Change

A state policy framework rooted in the realities of local communities, representing locally-devised solutions.

SchoolHouse Connection engages in state policy advocacy in partnership with local child and youth advocates, McKinney-Vento liaisons and State Coordinators, homeless service providers, colleges and universities, and civic organizations. Most importantly, young people with lived experience of homelessness are partners every step of the way, from prioritizing bill topics and drafting language, through the legislative advocacy process.

Bills

2019-2021 bills passed to date

Progress Updates

Bills Pending in 2021

States Where We Helped Pass Legislation

States Where We Worked on Policy, But Did Not Pass Legislation

States Where We Are Assisting with Policy Implementation

Promoting higher education completion

Current and Pending:

Maryland
Maryland HB 216 / SB 155 would:

  • Ensures the tuition waiver for students who have experienced homelessness or foster care applies to tuition and all fees for fall, winter, spring, and summer terms.
  • Establishes ongoing eligibility for the tuition waiver for youth determined to be homeless in the year prior to applying
  • Empowers school district liaisons, shelter directors, and financial aid officers to determine homelessness
  • Prioritizes students who have experienced homelessness or foster care for on-campus housing
  • Requires institutions to notify students of the tuition waiver application and establish an appeals process for denial of the tuition waiver
  • Includes data collection requirements

*Passed the House unanimously, 3/2/21.
*Passed the Senate unanimously, 4/12/21.
*Approved by governor 5/18/21.

Texas
HB 214 would:

  • Require existing Higher Education Foster Liaisons to support students experiencing homelessness who were not in foster care.
  • Provide Liaisons with basic professional development.
  • Require institutions of higher education to prioritize students experiencing homelessness for access to existing on-campus housing and to assist them in locating housing during academic breaks.

*Passed House Higher Education Committee unanimously, 5/3/21.
*The bill did not progress further before the legislature adjourned.

Past and Passed:

California
AB 806 would:

  • Make permanent the state law providing priority class enrollment for college students experiencing homelessness (eliminate “sunset clause”).
  • Ensure that youth who become homeless while in college receive priority class enrollment.

*Passed Assembly and Senate unanimously; Signed by Governor.

Maine
LD 866, HP 640 would:

  • Require institutions of higher education to designate a Liaison for students experiencing homelessness.
  • Require institutions of higher education to prioritize students experiencing homelessness for access to existing on-campus housing, develop a plan to provide students experiencing homelessness with housing during school breaks, and allow students experiencing homelessness who are enrolled part-time to access on-campus housing during their first year of school.
  • Expand the tuition waiver for state postsecondary educational institutions to include students experiencing homelessness.

*Passed the Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs unanimously; Enacted.

Nevada
NV AB 461 will:

  • Create a Post-Secondary Education Homeless Liaison and Office in the Nevada System of Higher Education.
  • Allow for waivers of registration fees and laboratory fees for homeless or unaccompanied students.

*Passed House and Senate unanimously; Approved by Governor.

Tennessee
HB 1000 and its companion bill SB 763 would require postsecondary institutions to:

  • Designate a Homeless Student Liaison, who will assist students experiencing homelessness in applying for and receiving financial aid and available services.
  • Give students experiencing homelessness priority access to on-campus housing, including housing that remains open the most days of the year.

*Passed House with 1 nay vote; Passed Senate unanimously; Signed by Governor.

Empowering youth experiencing homelessness to receive health and mental health care, shelter/housing, and other services

Current and Pending:

Kentucky
SB 21 would:

  • Allow youth age 16 or older to receive outpatient mental health counseling from any qualified mental health professional without parental consent.

*Passed Senate Health and Welfare Committee unanimously, 1/13/21. Passed full Senate unanimously 2/3/21.
*Passed full Senate 3/11/21. On its way to the governor for signature.
*Signed by Governor 3/18/21.

Montana
Montana SB 16 would:

  • Allow minors to consent to emergency shelter and related services.

*Heard by Senate Judiciary Committee, 1/12/21.
*Passed the Senate 2/27/21.
*Did not pass through the House before the legislature adjourned.

Montana SB 17 would:

  • Empower youth under 18 to sign leases and enter into other contracts for housing.

*Passed Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously, 1/19/21; Passed Senate unanimously, 1/22/21.
*Passed House Judiciary Committee unanimously 2/12/21.
*Passed the House unanimously 2/18/21. On its way to the governor for signature.
*Signed by Governor 3/2/21.

Nevada
AB 197 would:

  • Allow minors living apart from parents to access medical care more quickly.
  • Allow minors living apart from parents to access dental, nursing, and behavioral health care without parental consent.

*Received Do Pass recommendation from Assembly Health and Human Services Committee, 3/24/21.
*Passed the Assembly, 4/15/21.
*Passed Senate Health and Human Services Committee 5/13/21.
*Passed the Senate, 5/20/21. On its way to the governor for signature.
*Approved by governor 5/27/21.

North Dakota
SB 2265 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied homeless youth age 14 and older to consent for their own medical, dental and behavioral health care.
  • Allow unaccompanied parents to consent for their children’s medical, dental and behavioral health care.

*Passed Senate Human Services Committee, 1/27/21; Passed full Senate 1/29/21.
*Passed House Human Services Committee, 3/19/21.
*Passed full House 3/24/21.
*Signed by Governor 4/1/21.

SB 2258 would:

  • Create a legislative study of youth’s ability to access temporary shelter, including a review of current barriers, effective intervention, and necessary resources and services.

*Passed Senate Judiciary Committee, 2/17/21; Passed full Senate, 2/18/21.
*Passed House Human Services Committee unanimously, 3/17/21.
*Passed full House 4/9/21. Signed by governor 4/19/21.

Oregon
HB 2544 would:
  • Authorize grants to host home programs serving unaccompanied homeless youth ages 16 through 21
  • Appropriate $2.4 million for host home program grants
  • Appropriate $2 million for other programs and services for unaccompanied homeless youth ages 14 through 24, including shelters, outreach, culturally specific services, mental health and substance abuse services, and partnerships with host home programs and other transitional housing options.

*Status Received Do Pass recommendation from House Human Services Committee, 4/6/21.
*Passed House unanimously, 6/24/21; Passed Senate 6/26/21; Signed by governor 7/19/21.

Past and Passed:

Maine
LD 1275, SP 395 would:

  • Improve minors’ ability to consent for medical, mental, dental and other health counseling and services by removing time requirements and allowing minors to prove they are living separately from parents through various means, including a statement from a governmental or nonprofit agency that provides homeless service, a school district liaison, or an attorney representing the minor.
  • Protects health care practitioners from liability for treating minors (except for liability for their own negligent or willful acts).

*Passed House and Senate; Signed by Governor.

Maryland

HB 206 / SB 207 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied youth to consent for shelter and supportive services as long as the youth understands the services and can communicate informed consent
  • Require providers to contact a parent, guardian, or adult relative within 72 hours, unless that is not in the youth’s best interest, the youth refuses to provide such contact information, or the provider is unable to make contact.

*Passed the Senate unanimously March 5, 2020. Passed House unanimously March 11, 2020; Signed by Governor.

Missouri
SB 826 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied youth to consent for mental health care.
  • Streamline the process for unaccompanied youth to consent and contract for housing, services, medical and mental health care, employment, and higher education.
  • Allow homeless children and youth to receive Medicaid health coverage until age 21.

HB 1913 would:

  • Allow homeless children and youth to receive Medicaid health coverage until age 21.

HB 1288 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied youth to consent for mental health care.
  • Streamline the process for unaccompanied youth to consent and contract for housing, services, medical and mental health care, employment, and higher education.

*Incorporated by amendment into HB 1414, which passed both legislative chambers on May 14, 2020. Signed by Governor.”

North Carolina
HB 613 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied homeless minors to consent for physical examinations associated with participation in school activities, including extracurricular activities; dental care; optometry care; mental health care; and substance abuse treatment.

*Passed Assembly.

Utah
HB 371 will:

  • Allow licensed shelters and providers to serve homeless youth without criminal penalties.
  • Allow homeless youth 15 and older to consent for shelter and services.

*Passed House and Senate unanimously; Signed by Governor.

Strengthening tax credits for employers who hire youth experiencing homelessness

Current and Pending:

New Mexico
HB 118 would:

  • Create a tax credit for employers that hire youth experiencing homelessness for any period, part-time or full-time.

*Did not advance before the legislature adjourned.

Past and Passed:

Utah
HB 181 will:

  • Revise the definition of “homeless” to be more inclusive, particularly of young people.
  • Facilitate the issuance of tax credit certificates to employers that hire people experiencing homelessness.

*Signed by Governor.

Promoting high school graduation

Current and Pending:

California

California’s SB 532 would:

  • Reinforce the rights of students experiencing homelessness and those in foster care to remain in the school of origin to complete high school;
  • Extends the right to a fifth year in high school if necessary to earn a diploma to older students with significant gaps in attendance;
  • Allows certain students, including those experiencing homelessness, to graduate from high school without meeting LEA-specific requirements even after they are no longer homeless;
  • Gives certain students, including those experiencing homelessness, the right to a fifth year in high school to complete state graduation requirements;
  • Allows certain adult education students, including those experiencing homelessness, to graduate without meeting LEA-specific requirements; and
  • Ensures that unaccompanied youth can avail themselves of these rights.

*Passed Senate Education Committee unanimously, 3/17/21.
*Bill is being held over for the 2022 legislative session.

Maine
LD 1318 would:

  • Facilitate high school graduation for students experiencing homelessness and other students who experience educational disruptions.
  • Eliminate barriers to receiving a state diploma when the student is unable to complete a district diploma
  • Require the calculation, award, and transfer of partial credits.
  • Provide priority enrollment in classes in which a student has partial credit and individual educational materials and other options to enable the student to continue accruing credits.
  • Provide students with mentors when they change schools.

*Status Received Do Pass recommendation from the Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs, 5/5/21.
*Amended to add funding, and received Do Pass recommendation from the Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs, 6/10/21.
*Enacted and signed by governor, 7/9/21

Montana
SB 18 would:

  • Allow students to earn a state diploma, without meeting school district-specific requirements, if they experienced educational disruption in high school due to homelessness, child welfare or juvenile justice system involvement, a medical or mental health crisis, or other qualifying event.

*Passed Senate Education and Cultural Resources Committee unanimously, 1/26/21.
*Passed Senate unanimously, 1/29/21.
*Passed House Education Committee unanimously, 2/17/21.
*Passed full House 3/11/21. On its way to the governor for signature.
*Signed by Governor 3/26/21.

Nevada
SB 354. would:

  • Shine a light on disproportionalities in student discipline and require schools to address them. Protect students experiencing homelessness from removal from school when their behavior is substantially caused by homelessness.
  • Increase positive behavioral interventions and trauma-informed supports.
  • Ensure that unaccompanied youth can participate in their own disciplinary conferences.
  • Ensure the involvement of McKinney-Vento liaisons in discipline of students who may be experiencing homelessness.

*Received Do Pass recommendation from Senate Education Committee, 4/9/21.
*Passed the Senate, 4/20/21.
*Passed Assembly Education Committee 5/13/21.
*Passed the Assembly, 5/21/21. On its way to the governor for signature.

New Mexico
HB 93 would:

  • Ensure that students are suspended or expelled only after the exhaustion of interventions, including restorative justice practices, and only as a last resort following a process that accounts for circumstances such as homelessness, foster care placement, or other adverse childhood experiences and determines that suspension or expulsion is the only safe response.

*Received a Do Pass recommendation from the House Education Committee, 1/29/21.
*Received a Do Pass recommendation from the House State Government, Elections and Indian Affairs Committee, 2/10/21.
*Passed the House 3/1/21.
*Did not pass through the Senate before the legislature adjourned.

Past and Passed:

Connecticut

HB 7313 would:

  • Ensure that unaccompanied youth experiencing homelessness have access to the state education dispute resolution process.
  • Ensure that unaccompanied youth experiencing homelessness are able to continue attending the school in which the youth seek enrollment during the pendency of disputes.
  • Place the burden of proof in disputes involving a student experiencing homelessness on the school district, removing that burden from the student.
  • Otherwise strengthen the dispute resolution rights found in the McKinney-Vento Act, particularly for unaccompanied youth.

*Passed House unanimously; Passed Senate unanimously; Signed by Governor.

Indiana
SB 464 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied youth experiencing homelessness age 16 and older to take the high school equivalency exam without parental consent and at no cost.

*Passed House unanimously; Passed Senate; Signed by Governor.

Kentucky
HB 378 will:

  • Require the KY Department of Education to promulgate regulations regarding students experiencing homelessness, including awarding and accepting partial credit, facilitating enrollment in required classes, and providing for diplomas from a prior district or for meeting state minimum requirements for students who change schools in their last two years of high school.

*Passed House and Senate unanimously; Signed by Governor.

Nevada
SB 147 would:

  • Provide students experiencing homelessness with partial credits for partial coursework satisfactorily completed.
  • Require school districts to review and adjust the academic plans of students experiencing homelessness to maximize credit accrual and progress toward graduation.
  • Require school districts to award any diploma students experiencing homelessness have earned if they transfer schools in 11th or 12th grade.

*Passed Assembly and Senate unanimously; Approved by Governor.

Empowering youth experiencing homelessness to access vital documents

Current and Pending:

Nevada
AB 197 would:

  • Make sure people experiencing homelessness do not need to have birth certificate requests notarized.

*Approved by governor 5/27/21.

New Jersey
AB 1543 would:

  • Waive driver’s license and vehicle registration fees for youth verified as homeless by McKinney-Vento school district and charter school homeless liaisons.

New Mexico
HB 127 would:

  • Waive fees for state ID cards for people experiencing homelessness
  • Eliminate restrictions on access to ID cards for unaccompanied homeless youth
  • Require motor vehicle division offices to designate an existing staff member to serve as a homeless liaison.

*Received a Do Pass recommendation from the House Consumer and Public Affairs Committee, 1/28/21.
*Received a unanimous Do Pass recommendation from the House State Government, Elections and Indian Affairs Committee, 2/10/21.
*Passed the House 2/19/21.
*Passed the Senate Health and Public Affairs Committee 3/7/21.
*Received a Do Pass recommendation from the Senate Health and Public Affairs Committee, 3/13/21.
*Did not pass through the Senate before the legislature adjourned.

HB 179 would:
  • Eliminate fees for certified birth certificates for individuals experiencing homelessness
  • Eliminate restrictions on access to birth certificates for unaccompanied homeless youth
  • Allows McKinney-Vento school district liaisons, school counselors, school nurses, and social workers to obtain birth certificates of students and clients experiencing homelessness

*Received a unanimous Do Pass recommendation from the House Health and Human Services Committee, 2/10/21.
*Received a unanimous Do Pass recommendation from the House State Government, Elections and Indian Affairs Committee, 2/24/21.
*Passed the House unanimously 3/2/21.
*Received a Do Pass recommendation from the Senate Health and Public Affairs Committee, 3/13/21. *Passed the full Senate 3/14/21.
*Signed by governor 3/14/21.

North Dakota
SB 2258 would:

  • Allow people experiencing homelessness to obtain their birth certificates with only one proof of identification.
  • Allow people experiencing homelessness to prove their identity with a letter from a service provider, to obtain a birth certificate.
  • Empowers youth experiencing homelessness to obtain their own birth certificates.
  • Make sure people experiencing homelessness do not need to have birth certificate requests notarized.

*While the bill was pending before the Senate Human Services Committee, the Division of Vital Records agreed to implement all of the bill’s provisions voluntarily. Therefore, the bill was amended to address issues of youth housing programs. See the tab, “Empowering Youth Experiencing Homelessness to Receive Health and Mental Health Care, Shelter/Housing, and Other Services” for more information.

Past and Passed:

Indiana
SB 464 would:

  • Allow unaccompanied youth experiencing homelessness age 16 and older to apply for a driver’s license, obtain a state ID, and obtain a copy of their birth certificates without parental consent and without a fee.

*Passed House unanimously; Passed Senate; Signed by Governor.

Kentucky
HB 378 will:

  • Waive birth certificate fees for children and youth experiencing homelessness.

*Passed House and Senate unanimously; Signed by Governor.

Missouri

SB 826 / HB 1286 would:

  • Allow homeless children and youth to receive Medicaid health coverage until age 21.
  • Waive birth certificate fees for parents and guardians of homeless children and youth, and for unaccompanied homeless youth.
  • Allow unaccompanied youth to obtain birth certificates without parental consent.

*Incorporated by amendment into HB 1414, which passed both legislative chambers on May 14, 2020. Signed by Governor.

Nevada
AB 363 would:

  • Provide a one-time fee waiver for state ID cards and driver licenses for homeless youth under age 25.
  • Provide birth certificates at no cost to homeless youth, their school district liaisons, and their social workers.
  • Allow unaccompanied youth to obtain statements of birth at no cost for the purpose of admission to school or securing employment. 
  • Waive driver’s license test fees for homeless youth.

*Passed Assembly and Senate unanimously; Approved by Governor.

Utah
HB 465 will:

  • Waive birth certificate fees and photo ID fees for children and youth experiencing homelessness.

*HB 465 passed as an amendment to HB 371. It has been signed by the Governor.

Increasing access to child care

States Where We Worked on Policy, But Did Not Pass:

California
AB 2552 would:

  • Give children experiencing homelessness first priority for child care subsidies, along with neglect or abused children.
  • Give children experiencing homelessness a grace period of six weeks to provide immunization documents.
  • Exempt children experiencing homelessness from providing proof of address requirements to enroll in subsidized child care.
  • Require child care and development service providers to conduct outreach to families experiencing homelessness, including through collaboration with McKinney-Vento liaisons and other homeless service providers, to share information about enrollment in, and priority for, subsidized child care and to streamline the application process for homeless families.

North Carolina
HB 613 would:

  • Require the State Social Services Commission to adopt rules facilitating access to child care for children experiencing homelessness, including but not limited to rules that establish homelessness as a need for care; prioritize children experiencing homelessness on waiting lists; allow parents of children experiencing homelessness to substitute school attendance for work requirements; and limit work requirements to 20 hours per week for parents of children experiencing homelessness. 

Community of Practice

Building on the success of our state policy work, we’re excited to announce the Building Teams for Change Community of Practice, our inaugural program to provide adult and youth partners throughout the country with state legislative advocacy substantive training along with a community of professionals. The virtual sessions will be facilitated by SchoolHouse Connection staff and experts in state policy and homelessness. Virtual sessions will be held the second Wednesday of every other month from 2:00 – 3:30 PM (EST) beginning March 25, 2021. Participants will gain knowledge of specific policy issues impacting children and youth experiencing homelessness and key strategies in legislative advocacy campaigns.

Upcoming Events:

Session #5: Youth Leadership in Advocacy Work
Thursday, October 14, 2021, 2:00 – 3:00PM Eastern
Join Zoom Meeting

Session #6: End-of-Year Review
Wednesday, November 10, 2021, 2:00 – 3:30 PM Eastern

Past Events:

Session #1: State Advocacy 101: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How

Watch the Recording
Download the Powerpoint

Session #2: Data, Statistics, and Special Populations

Watch the Recording
Download the Powerpoint

Session #3: Best Practices in State Advocacy

Watch the Recording
Download the Powerpoint

Session #4: Best Practices in Local Advocacy

Watch the Recording

 

State Policy At Work

State Advocacy Tools

State Advocacy Training Webinars

Episode 1 provides an overview of our state advocacy methodology and includes sample policy surveys for young people and advocates, a sample agenda for a State Advocacy Institute, and sample activities to engage stakeholders and young people in policy advocacy.
Watch Episode 1
Download the Powerpoint & Handouts (Link to Dropbox folder)

Episode 2 is an advocacy “how-to” guide, sharing tools and skills for state and federal policy advocacy, including a sample policy agenda and sample policy brief. We hope these tools will encourage new advocates to get involved with state and federal policy, and provide seasoned advocates with new resources.
Watch Episode 2
Download the Powerpoint & Handouts (Link to Dropbox folder)

Guide to State Laws to Support Youth Experiencing Homelessness

An important step in policy advocacy is knowing what legislation already exists on an issue. “State Laws to Support Youth Experiencing Homelessness” provides state-specific information and model statutes on four categories of state laws:

  1. Laws allowing unaccompanied homeless minors to consent for housing and shelter services;
  2. Laws empowering unaccompanied minors to consent for routine medical care;
  3. Laws that mitigate the effects of mobility to help students experiencing homelessness graduate from high school; and
  4. Laws supporting students experiencing homelessness in higher education.

Get the Guide

State Law Briefs

State Laws on Vital Records
This document summarizes the current state laws on vital records pertaining to children and youth experiencing homelessness.

State Provisions to Help Children Experiencing Homelessness Access Child Care and Preschool
Many states have passed laws, regulations and policies to enhance federal protections that help children experiencing homelessness access child care and preschool. This document summarizes those state provisions.

State Laws on Minor Consent for Routine Medical Care
This document includes states with laws allowing minors, including unaccompanied homeless minors, to consent for routine health care. It does not address state laws that empower minors to consent for substance abuse treatment, mental health care, treatment for contagious diseases or reproductive health.

State Laws on Minor Consent for Housing and Related Services
Several state legislatures have recognized that unaccompanied homeless youth under age 18 need legal rights to access safe housing, shelter and other basic services. This document summarizes state laws on minor consent to housing and supportive services.

State Laws to Increase High School Graduation for Students Experiencing Homelessness
The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA) places great emphasis on high school graduation for students experiencing homelessness. This document summarizes state laws that complement these federal requirements.

State Laws Supporting College Students Experiencing Homelessness
State legislatures have been actively supporting college students experiencing homelessness over the past few years. This document provides a summary of existing state laws.

Blog Posts

Celebrating State Policy Successes on Youth Homelessness

As state legislative sessions come to a close throughout the country, SchoolHouse Connection and our partners are celebrating major state policy wins for children and youth experiencing homelessness. Every year, our team undertakes legislative advocacy campaigns with talented and passionate state and local advocates. In 2021, to date, we worked with advocates in California, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, and Texas.

The State of SHC’s 2021 State Policy Advocacy on Youth Homelessness

SHC’s state policy team is building on our 2020 successes with 2021 legislative advocacy campaigns in California, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Texas. Together with local teams and young people, we are focusing on minor consent and access to services, success in higher education, high school graduation, and employment.

State Laws on Vital Records

This document summarizes the current state laws on vital records pertaining to children and youth experiencing homelessness.

More State Policy Victories for Youth Experiencing Homelessness

SchoolHouse Connection convened a broad, inter-agency coalition in Missouri in late 2018, to identify state policy barriers to addressing youth homelessness. Youth experiencing homelessness, service providers, early childhood programs, public schools and other concerned advocates participated in our State Policy Institutes and joined our coalition. Together, we identified the policies in HB 1414 as key areas for reform. We designed the bill language, rallied support statewide, and were successful in having several bills introduced in 2019. This year, Kids Win Missouri took our bills back to the legislature, and moved them to passage with the support of lobbyists and advocates.

First State Bills for 2019 Introduced, with More on the Way

Although state legislatures will not begin considering new legislation until early next year, SchoolHouse Connection and our state policy partners have been working feverishly for months to prepare. Last week, our first bill was introduced: a higher education bill in the Texas state legislature. Proposals in other states will tackle higher education, vital documents, minor consent, credit accrual, child care, employment, and transportation.

SchoolHouse Connection’s State Policy Work In The News

Bill Would Bar Texas School Districts From Suspending Homeless Students
Dallas Observer
Thousands of students in the Dallas Independent School District show up to school each morning not knowing where they’ll sleep that night. Under a bill in the Texas Senate, districts wouldn’t be allowed to suspend such students if they misbehave.

Bill aims to help homeless college students
NewsChannel5 – Nashville
Students on a college campus come from diverse backgrounds. Some are athletes, others are scholars. Some are local, some travel from across the country to travel to their school. Some grew up surrounded by family, others have found themselves homeless leading into their college experience.

Bill would help homeless youth access services
Mainely Media
Homelessness can be a brutal, trying experience for anyone who experiences it. It can cause or complicate health problems, contribute to a loss of self esteem and carries an unfortunate stigma that can be hard to shake.

Mental Health Bill Aims to Help Homeless Youth
89.3 WFPL
A bill under consideration in the General Assembly would give more homeless youth in Kentucky access to mental health services. Under House Bill 213, unaccompanied children age 16 and older would not need permission from a parent or guardian for mental health services.  Rep. Joni Jenkins (D-Louisville) is sponsoring the bill and says it could help 3,000 young people in Kentucky.

 

 

Bill designates liaison, housing priority for Tennessee’s homeless college students
Tennessean
The bill, SB 763, would designate a staff member already employed at Tennessee higher education institutions, including community colleges, to serve as a homeless student liaison.

Legislation moves forward to help Kentucky’s homeless teens
WHAS11
House Bill 378 was unanimously passed by the House Standing Committee on Education on March 5.

Homelessness Advocates Tell of New Successes Via State Legislation
Youth Today
Some laws can make life exceptionally difficult for homeless and runaway youth. Whether it’s requiring parental consent to receive health care or demanding proof of residency to obtain a photo ID, unfriendly policies have left many service providers feeling frustrated and powerless to help. A small national nonprofit based in Washington is working to change that.

Lack of Housing a Significant Issue for North Dakota’s Unaccompanied Youth
KXNet
At this very moment, there are 300 unaccompanied minors living in North Dakota, meaning 300 kids under 18 don’t have a stable home or guardian.

 

Get in Touch. Get Involved.

Are you ready to get involved with policy advocacy in your state?
If so, contact us for help or to join in our advocacy work in your state.

 

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